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Building Victim Assistance Networks With Faith Communities: Lessons Learned by the Vermont Victim Services 2000 Project
About This E-PublicationAcknowledgmentsMessage From the DirectorAbout the AuthorsRelated Links
The Need for Collaboration
Victim Needs From a Faith-Based Perspective
Elements of Collaboration
Lessons Learned
Issues Unique to Faith-Based Victim Assistance
Supplementary Materials
Faith Based Victim Assistance Organizations
April 2007

NCJ 215201
Photo of a victim support group seated in a circle and a photo of the hands of several people placed on top of each other in a show of support.

The lasting scars of spirit and faith are not so easily treated. Many victims question the faith they thought secure, or have no faith on which
to rely. Frequently, ministers and their congregations can be a source of solace that no other sector of society can provide.

-President's Task Force on Victims of Crime (1982)

Communities of faith are in a unique position to offer support to crime victims. Victims often seek comfort and spiritual guidance from religious leaders in the aftermath of crime. Religious and spiritual leaders can quickly mobilize resources and bring disparate groups together in support of victims. For example, they may extend to victims resources that were originally established for poor, disabled, and elderly members-including food pantries, clothing banks, emergency funds, meeting space, childcare, transportation, and even emergency housing.

This document summarizes how the Vermont Center for Crime Victim Services, as part of the Office for Victims of Crime's Victim Services 2000 demonstration project, built and used relationships with the faith community to improve victim services. It specifically addresses-


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