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Announcements

Be Counted! Participate in the National Census of Victim Service Providers

The National Census of Victim Service ProvidersNational Census of Victim Service Providers (NCVSP) is the first-ever national count of all programs responding to victims and survivors of crime and abuse, providing the most comprehensive picture of the victim services field to date.

Funded by the Office for Victims of Crime and the Bureau of Justice Statistics, U.S. Department of Justice, the NCVSP will capture basic information about the field, helping reveal gaps and opportunities. Your participation is an opportunity for the critical services you provide to be included in the “big picture” of victim response.

Thank you to those who have completed the survey. Please encourage your colleagues and peers to do the same so we have a full, accurate account of the services available to victims.

If you have not completed your NCVSP, please do so today. Log in and complete your survey.

If you have not received an invitation to complete this survey but are serving victims, please contact Angela Herrmann at NORC by phone at 877–504–1086 or email today. If you have already completed this survey and are still being contacted, please also let Ms. Herrmann know, so that she can remove the duplicate listing.

For more information, please visit the NCVSP project webpage.

(Posted April 18, 2017)

The Vicarious Trauma Toolkit Helps Organizations Address Work-Related Exposure to Trauma

VTTIt takes tremendous courage for victim service providers, emergency medical services, fire services, law enforcement, and other allied professionals to respond to tragic events. It also takes commitment to do this work despite the personal, physical, emotional, and mental impact it can have.

Research shows that vicarious trauma, when left unaddressed, can lead to staff burnout, turnover, stress, and a lesser quality of services for victims.

The newly released OVC Vicarious Trauma Toolkit can be used to:

  1. conduct an assessment of your agency's current capacity as a vicarious trauma-informed organization;
  2. review your existing capacity, identify gaps, and prioritize needs;
  3. locate resources and tools to help meet your identified needs; and
  4. develop a comprehensive plan to address exposure to single incidents of crime or violence and acts of mass violence and terrorism.

Additionally, the toolkit contains a state-of-the-art repository of nearly 500 resources tailored specifically to these fields that provides the knowledge and skills necessary for organizations to address the vicarious trauma needs of their staff and promote resiliency.

(Posted April 11, 2017)

2017 National Crime Victims’ Service Award Recipients

Jesse Panuccio, Acting Associate Attorney General, Alan Hanson, Acting Assistant Attorney General, Office of Justice Programs, and Marilyn McCoy Roberts, OVC Acting Director honored 12 individuals, programs, teams, and organizations during the National Crime Victims’ Service Awards Ceremony on April 7.

Learn more about the extraordinary contributions of this year’s award recipients:

Stay tuned for details on the nomination period for the 2018 National Crime Victims’ Service Awards, which will open later this spring.

(Posted April 7, 2017)

Funding Opportunity: Vision 21: Linking Systems of Care for Children and Youth State Demonstration Project

OVC seeks applicants to address the enduring issue of child and youth victimization through state-level demonstration projects (PDF 217 kb).

We pay for child and youth victimization in many ways: health and mental health care, child welfare, special education, juvenile and criminal justice, and losses in productivity over the individual’s lifespan. Although many systems exist to respond to these various issues, these systems often fail to communicate and collaborate effectively to get to the root of the problem.

The competitively awarded demonstration sites will bring all of the relevant systems and professionals together to establish a coordinated approach. This approach will ensure that every child entering these systems is assessed for victimization, that children and their families are provided comprehensive and coordinated services to fully address their needs, and that practices and policies are established to sustain this approach long term.

The project will be conducted in two phases—Phase 1: Planning (15 months) and Phase 2: Implementation (5 years).

OVC expects to make up to two awards of up to $500,000 each through this demonstration initiative.

Download the solicitation (PDF 217 kb).

Apply by May 11, 2017.

(Posted March 23, 2017)

Funding Opportunity: National Indian Nations Conference: Justice for Victims of Crime

OVC seeks applicants to plan and conduct the 16th and 17th National Indian Nations Conference: Justice for Victims of Crime (PDF 195 kb), which will take place in 2018 and 2020, respectively.

Since 1988, OVC has sponsored 15 Indian Nations: Justice for Victims of Crime Conferences (Indian Nations Conferences) that have attracted thousands of participants involved in meeting the needs of victims of crime in Indian Country.

The Indian Nations Conference provides victim advocates and allied professionals with a unique forum to share their successes, challenges, lessons learned, best practices, and visions for the future of crime victim services in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities.

OVC expects to make one award of up to $499,000 for a 24-month performance period and to make a supplemental award based on performance and appropriations.

Download the solicitation (PDF 195 kb).

Apply by May 9, 2017.

(Posted March 22, 2017)

Funding Opportunity: Serving Crime Victims with Disabilities: A Seamless Approach from First Response to Healing

The goal of this solicitation is to update and expand OVC’s resources to support crime victims with disabilities (PDF 522 kb), particularly the following two resources:

Since these documents were first published, expansive work has been done on disabilities and the technology landscape of victimization has rapidly changed. In addition, there is a need for guidance on making services accessible and appropriate to crime victims with disabilities throughout the process from first response and forensic interviewing to healing.

OVC expects to make up to one award of up to $1,333,333.

Apply by May 2, 2017.

(Posted March 16, 2017)

OVC Awards Almost $8.5 Million to Support Victims of Pulse Nightclub Shooting

Earlier today, OVC announced an $8,466,970 Antiterrorism and Emergency Assistance Program (AEAP) grant to the Florida Office of the Attorney General, Florida Department of Legal Affairs to assist victims of the June 2016 mass shooting at Pulse Nightclub in Orlando, Florida.

OVC Acting Director Marilyn McCoy Roberts states, “This award will reimburse victim services costs for operation of the Family Assistance Center in the immediate aftermath of the shooting, and to ensure that victims, witnesses and first responders receive necessary services to help them adjust in the aftermath of violence, begin the healing process, and cope with probable re-traumatization.”

Visit the AEAP website to learn how this program supports communities responding to incidents of terrorism and mass violence.

(Posted March 14, 2017)

New Platform for Online Discussions with National Experts

OVC, through its Training and Technical Assistance Center (OVC TTAC), is excited to announce a new platform to share our best practices and standards for serving victims of crime.

The OVC TTAC Expert Q&A Online Discussion will replace the OVC Web Forum. Within this new platform, participants will have an enhanced ability to communicate with national experts and colleagues about hot topics and other issues relating to crime victim services.

Expert Q&A Online Discussions will be held each month and one or more subject matter experts will be available to answer your questions.

There is no charge to attend the Expert Q&A sessions. If you can’t attend one of these interactive trainings, each event will be recorded and made available to view on the OVC TTAC website.

Although the Expert Q&A sessions replace the OVC Web Forum, you may still access transcripts from past Web Forum Guest Host sessions.


(Posted January 25, 2017)

Resources for National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month

Human trafficking is a horrendous crime that impacts communities throughout our Nation. With increased awareness, improved services, and effective prosecutions, we can work together to fight this crime and support the survivors. Every January, we commemorate National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month to renew our commitment to helping trafficking victims.

In an effort to help communities prepare for local events for this January, we highlight the following OVC resources —

Faces of Human Trafficking Resource GuideFaces of Human Trafficking Resource Guide
This award-winning multidisciplinary resource can be used to raise awareness of the seriousness of human trafficking, the many forms it can take, and the important role that everyone can play in identifying and serving victims.

This resource includes nine videos, a discussion guide, four fact sheets, and four posters. The guide can be viewed online or a limited quantity of physical copies may be ordered through the OVC Resource Center (shipping and handling fees will be applied.)

Human Trafficking Task Force E-GuideHuman Trafficking Task Force E-Guide
Developed in partnership with the Bureau of Justice Assistance, this Guide is a resource to support established task forces and provide guidance to agencies that are forming task forces.

Its purpose is to assist in the development and day-to-day operations of an anti-human trafficking task force and to provide fundamental guidance for effective task force operations.

Human Trafficking Weblet
This online tool contains resources and information for a variety of audiences including victims/survivors, victim service providers, law enforcement, and allied professionals.

OVC has also released multiple funding opportunities available to victim service providers to enhance the services available to victims of human trafficking. View our Current Funding Opportunities page to learn more and apply.


(Posted January 10, 2017)

Acting OVC Director

Photo of Marilyn M. Roberts, Acting Director of the Office for Victims of Crime.
Marilyn M. Roberts has been appointed to serve as OVC Acting Director effective January 3, 2017. Previously, Ms. Roberts was OVC’s Deputy Director for the State Compensation and Assistance and Operations Division, where she had oversight of OVC’s Victims of Crime Act (VOCA) formula grant program, and internal operations, including budget, training and technical assistance, and communications functions.

Prior to joining OVC in October 2013, Ms. Roberts spent 11 years with OJP’s Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP), starting as a special advisor to the Administrator and becoming the Deputy Administrator for Programs in 2004. In that capacity, Ms. Roberts oversaw the three programmatic divisions of OJJDP. Before joining OJJDP, she was the director of the Drug Courts Program Office at OJP.

Prior to her government service, Ms. Roberts held several management positions during her 18-year career at the National Center for State Courts, a nonprofit organization devoted to the improvement of state court administration.


(Posted January 4, 2017)

OVC Director Joye E. Frost Retires

Photo of Joye E. Frost, Director of the Office for Victims of Crime.
After almost 20 years with OVC, Director Joye Frost retired on December 31, 2016. Ms. Frost started working at OVC as a program specialist and subsequently served as OVC Acting Director and Principal Deputy Director before being appointed as the OVC Director by President Obama on June 14, 2013.

Among her many accomplishments during her tenure at OVC, Ms. Frost launched the Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services initiative to expand the reach and impact of the victim assistance field. She forged closer ties with State Victims of Crime Act administrators and championed the integration of innovation with research in OVC’s efforts to build capacity in the field. She also expanded OVC’s work to assist underserved victims, including boys and young men of color, LGBTQ individuals, and American Indian/Alaska Native communities and oversaw the complex process of drafting the VOCA Assistance Rule, which the Department released this past summer.

Ms. Frost began her career as a Child Protective Services caseworker in South Texas and worked in the victim assistance, healthcare, and disability advocacy fields for more than 35 years in the United States and Europe.

On behalf of the field, OVC staff want to extend our thanks to Ms. Frost for her steadfast leadership and lifelong service to crime victims and wish her a happy retirement.


(Posted January 4, 2017)

Video Provides Information on Services Available to Native Victims of Crime

Partners in Justice—Bureau of Indian Affairs Victim Specialists is a new video which presents an overview of the U.S. Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Victim Specialist Program. The video, prepared by OVC and BIA, identifies some of the program’s successes and challenges providing services to victims of crime in Indian Country.

The video provides an explanation of the services available to Native victims of crime through the program and how the program complements tribally operated victim services programs.


View this video and other OVC materials designed to inform and assist victim service providers and allied professionals in their efforts to help crime victims in Indian Country by visiting the OVC Tribal Multimedia Resources page.


(Posted December 14, 2016)

Helping Alcohol-Facilitated Sexual Assault Victims in Indian Country

The Office for Victims of Crime (OVC), in collaboration with the Office on Violence Against Women, produced a new video series to support victims of sexual assault in Indian Country. Alcohol-Facilitated Sexual Assault in Indian Country is a four-video series designed for criminal justice personnel, victim advocates, and allied professionals.

Helping Alcohol-Facilitated Sexual Assault Victims in Indian Country ©iStock.com/Jennifer McCormick

The videos in this series—

  • Increase awareness about the prevalence of alcohol used as a vehicle to facilitate sexual violence perpetration and the targeting of vulnerable victims, to include intoxicated persons, by sex offenders.
  • Provide commentary on enhancing the investigation and prosecution of sexual violence crimes.
  • Present case studies that illustrate best practices for responding to victims of alcohol-facilitated sexual assault and underscore the need for collaboration and a coordinated multijurisdictional response.

Visit the OVC Tribal Multimedia Resources page to view the videos online.


(Posted December 7, 2016)

OVC Resources Raise Awareness About Human Trafficking

Human trafficking is a horrendous crime that impacts communities throughout our nation. With increased awareness, improved services for victims, and effective prosecutions, we can work together to fight this crime and support the survivors.

In an effort to help communities prepare for local events for National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month this January, we highlight the following OVC resources –

Faces of Human Trafficking Resource GuideFaces of Human Trafficking Resource Guide
This multidisciplinary resource can be used to raise awareness of the seriousness of human trafficking, the many forms it can take, and the important role that everyone can play in identifying and serving victims.

This resource includes nine videos, a discussion guide, four fact sheets, and four posters. The guide can be viewed online or a limited quantity of physical copies may be ordered through the OVC Resource Center (shipping and handling fees will be applied.)

Human Trafficking Task Force E-GuideHuman Trafficking Task Force E-Guide
Developed in partnership with the Bureau of Justice Assistance, this Guide is a resource to support established task forces and provide guidance to agencies that are forming task forces.

Its purpose is to assist in the development and day to day operations of an anti-human trafficking task force and to provide fundamental guidance for effective task force operations.

For more information about OVC’s resources for human trafficking and how you can get involved in spreading awareness, view our Human Trafficking website.


(Posted November 22, 2016)

Statement on the Passing of Attorney General Janet Reno

OVC expresses its condolences to the family of former United States Attorney General Janet Reno, who passed away on November 7, 2016. Throughout her distinguished career, Attorney General Reno served as a tireless advocate on behalf of victims of crime, and offered strong support for increasing access to and improving services for victims throughout the Nation. In a statement released on November 7, Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch notes: “With the passing of Janet Reno, the Department of Justice has lost one of the most effective, decisive and well-respected leaders in its proud history. From her years in state law enforcement to her long and eventful tenure as Attorney General, Janet Reno always strove, as she put it, to do her ‘level best.’" Read the full Statement by Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch on the Passing of Attorney General Janet Reno.


(Posted November 8, 2016)

New Video Series Supports Alaska Native Victims of Crime

OVC in collaboration with the Office on Violence Against Women announces a new video series to support Alaska Native victims of crime. A Healing Journey for Alaska Natives is an educational video series designed for federal, state, local, and tribal victim service providers, criminal justice professionals, and others who work with Alaska Native victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, and human trafficking.

The videos in this series—

  • A Healing Journey for Alaska Nativesincrease awareness about violence committed against Alaska Natives.
  • identify first responders to Alaska Native victims of crime.
  • illustrate the challenges faced by Alaska Native victims and the critical role that culture and tradition play in both the well–being of Alaska Natives and in helping victims and communities heal.
  • present techniques and strategies for enhancing responses to and the investigation of violence against Alaska Natives.
  • illustrate – through case studies and personal experiences – how local customs, traditions, and best practices underscore the need for a multidisciplinary, multijurisdictional, collaborative response to violence committed against Alaska Natives.

View the videos online or order the DVD from the OVC Resource Center.


(Posted October 26, 2016)

OVC Awards Funds to Improve Responses to Violence, Including Officer Shootings

Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch announced that OVC awarded $7 million to help communities respond to high profile violence, including shootings that involve law enforcement officers.

The award, made to the International Association of Chiefs of Police in collaboration with the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and the Yale School of Medicine, will help cities develop strategies to defuse tension and promote healing following events that cause collective community trauma.

In a recent speech, Attorney General Lynch states that the grant, awarded by OVC as part of the Vision 21 Initiative, "represents the best of collaborations — where those with different voices but one goal come together to bring hope and help to those who rely on us all."

This award strengthens the Department of Justice's commitment to building bridges of trust between communities and the agencies that serve them.


(Posted October 7, 2016)

Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) Program Development and Operation Guide

SANE Program Development and Operation Guide Nearly two decades after releasing the original guide for SANE programs, the OVC Training and Technical Assistance Center is pleased to announce the new and improved SANE Program Development and Operation Guide.

  • Available online for the first time, so the Guide can be updated continually with new resources.
  • Mobile optimized for easy access via tablet or smartphone.
  • Fully updated with new research and innovative practices.
  • All the latest information you need to create a new SANE program or enhance an existing one.
  • Reorganized around 5 key principles: trauma-informed, patient-centered care, multidisciplinary approach, community uniqueness, and evidence-based practice.

Check out the new SANE Guide to see how it can help improve your SANE program and ensure that all sexual assault victims receive the highest standard of patient-centered care.

Watch this video to learn more about SANE Program.


(Posted August 31, 2016)

Victims of Crime Act (VOCA) Formula Victim Assistance Rule

The Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) announces that the final rule for its Victims of Crime Act (VOCA) Formula Victim Assistance Grant Program became effective on August 8, 2016. The final rule sets forth the parameters for the use of funds under OVC's Victim Assistance Program. OVC consulted extensively with the crime victim services field in developing the rule, and published a notice of proposed rulemaking (78 FR 52877) on August 27, 2013, which solicited public comments. OVC has taken these comments, as well as comments received during the inter-agency review process, into consideration in this final rule.

  • It applies to any OVC Formula Victim Assistance Program grants awarded by OVC after the effective date.
  • However, FY16 grant funding obligated by a state before the award date AND before the effective date (i.e., pre-award costs incurred before the effective date) are not subject to the rule, and remain under the VOCA Assistance Guidelines, though a state may choose to apply the rule to those funds.
  • Funds under grants awarded by OVC before the rule's effective date continue to be subject to the Guidelines, but a state may choose to apply the rule to any unobligated funding at the state or subrecipient levels under such a grant.
  • Such discretionary decisions to apply the rule should be documented to facilitate monitoring and audit.

The final rule provides greater clarity and more flexibility to state VOCA victim assistance administering agencies to support a continuum of services to crime victims, including:

  • comprehensive legal assistance,
  • transitional housing,
  • expanded coverage of relocation expenses, and
  • the use of funds for forensic interviews and medical examinations.

The rule clarifies the requirements regarding services to underserved victims, and continues to provide that victims of elder abuse, human trafficking, and other crimes are eligible for VOCA-funded assistance. The rule removes existing language that restricts the use of VOCA funding to support services to victims in detention and correctional facilities.

OVC has published a summary of changes (PDF 431 kb) made by the rule, and will publish questions and answers as they arise on the OVC website.


(Posted August 8, 2016; Updated August 26, 2016)

Past Announcements

March 2017

Watch the 2017 National Crime Victims' Service Awards Ceremony Online

The Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) invites you to watch this year’s National Crime Victims’ Service Awards Ceremony as part of National Crime Victims’ Rights Week. The annual ceremony will take place on April 7, 2017, from 2:00-3:30 p.m. (eastern time).

Watch the live stream (webcast) of the event on OVC’s YouTube channel (registration is not required).

Past awards ceremonies have been attended by crime victims and survivors, victim advocates, and allied professionals from around the Nation. Learn more about the awards and this year’s categories.

(Posted March 31, 2017)

Funding Webinar: Vision 21: Linking Systems of Care for Children and Youth State Demonstration Project

On April 10, 2017, at 2 p.m. (eastern time), join OVC for a webinar that will provide details and guidance for potential applicants to the Vision 21: Linking Systems of Care for Children and Youth State Demonstration Project Solicitation (PDF 216 kb). OVC Grants Management Specialists Stacy Phillips and Lindsay Waldrop will discuss the purpose and goals of this funding opportunity and address frequently asked questions. A Q&A session will conclude the webinar.

Register to attend the webinar.

(Posted March 30, 2017)

Now Available in Spanish—2017 NCVRW Resource Guide

NCVRW2017OVC is pleased to announce the release of the Spanish version of its 2017 National Crime Victims' Rights Week (NCVRW) Resource Guide (título en español: La Guía de Recursos de la Semana Nacional de los Derechos de Víctimas del Crimen 2017). NCVRW will be commemorated April 2-8, 2017, and the resource guide promotes this year's theme —Strength. Resilience. Justice. (Fuerza. Resistencia. Justicia.)

The resource guide provides all of the materials necessary to promote public awareness campaigns for NCVRW and throughout the year. Campaign materials include planning tips, artwork, crime and victimization fact sheets, and more.

Access both the English and Spanish versions of the NCVRW Resource Guide today.

(Posted March 3, 2017)

February 2017

2017 NCVRW Resource Guide is Now Available Online

NCVRW2017OVC is pleased to announce the release of its 2017 National Crime Victims' Rights Week (NCVRW) Resource Guide. NCVRW will be commemorated April 2-8, 2017, and the resource guide promotes this year's theme —Strength. Resilience. Justice.

The resource guide provides all of the materials necessary to promote public awareness campaigns for NCVRW and throughout the year. Campaign materials include planning tips, artwork, crime and victimization fact sheets, and more. A Spanish version of the resource guide will be coming soon.

Please join OVC to help communities across the country in raising awareness of crime victims' rights and services, highlighting local programs, celebrating progress achieved, and honoring victims and the professionals who serve them.

Access the Resource Guide today.


(Posted February 16, 2017)

Funding Webinar: Specialized Services for Victims of Human Trafficking

On February 15, 2017, at 2 p.m. (eastern time), join OVC for a webinar that will provide details and guidance for potential applicants to the Specialized Services for Victims of Human Trafficking solicitation (PDF 306 kb). The presenters will discuss the purpose and goals of this funding opportunity and address frequently asked questions. A Q&A session will conclude the webinar.

Register to attend the webinar.


(Posted February 10, 2017)

Funding Webinar: Specialized Human Trafficking Training and Technical Assistance for Service Providers

On Monday, February 13, 2017, at 2 p.m. (eastern time), OVC will hold a webinar on the Specialized Human Trafficking Training and Technical Assistance for Service Providers solicitation (PDF 259 kb). This webinar will provide details and guidance for potential applicants to provide intensive human trafficking training and technical assistance to service providers in one of two purpose areas: (1) housing, and (2) employment. The presenter will discuss the purpose and goals of this funding opportunity and address frequently asked questions. A Q&A session will conclude the webinar.

Register to attend the webinar.


(Posted February 9, 2017)

Be Counted! Participate in the National Census of Victim Service Providers

The National Census of Victim Service ProvidersNational Census of Victim Service Providers (NCVSP) is the first-ever national count of all programs responding to victims and survivors of crime and abuse, providing the most comprehensive picture of the victim services field to date.

Funded by the Office for Victims of Crime and the Bureau of Justice Statistics, U.S. Department of Justice, the NCVSP will capture basic information about the field, helping reveal gaps and opportunities. Your participation is an opportunity for the critical services you provide to be included in the “big picture” of victim response.

Thank you to those who have completed the survey. Please encourage your colleagues and peers to do the same so we have a full, accurate account of the services available to victims.

If you have not completed your NCVSP, please do so today. Login and complete your survey.

If you have not received an invitation to complete this survey but are serving victims, please contact Angela Herrmann at NORC by phone at 877–504–1086 or email today.

For more information, please visit the NCVSP project webpage.


(Posted February 7, 2017)

January 2017

Funding Opportunity: Specialized Human Trafficking Training and Technical Assistance for Service Providers

OVC seeks applicants to provide intensive training and technical assistance to trafficking service providers (PDF 259 kb) in one of two focus areas: (1) housing, and (2) employment, in order to assist them in developing and implementing meaningful housing and/or employment practices.

The objectives of this program are to improve quality and quantity of services in the selected purpose area offered to trafficking survivors by increasing capacity of victim service providers nationwide through training and technical assistance, and to improve victim service providers’ partnerships at the national, state, and local level with relevant purpose area stakeholders.

OVC expects to make up to two awards (one per purpose area) of up to $850,000. Apply by March 16, 2017.


(Posted January 17, 2017)

Funding Opportunity: Specialized Services for Victims of Human Trafficking

Awards of up to $600,000 will be made to enhance the quality and quantity of specialized services available to assist all victims of human trafficking (PDF 306 kb), including services for underserved or unserved populations such as men and boys, American Indians and Alaska Natives, African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos, Native Hawaiians, Pacific Islanders, and individuals who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, or questioning.

Funding will also support efforts to increase the capacity of communities to respond to human trafficking victims through the development of interagency partnerships, professional training, and public awareness activities.

Apply by March 9, 2017.


(Posted January 11, 2017)

Funding Opportunity: Enhanced Collaborative Model to Combat Human Trafficking

The Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) and the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) will award between $600,000 and $900,000 to law enforcement agencies and victim service providers to work collaboratively to enhance multidisciplinary human trafficking task forces (PDF, 364 kb) that combat sex and labor trafficking of foreign nationals and U.S. citizens of all sexes and ages.

Eligible applicants are law enforcement agencies and victim service providers who submit separate but coordinated proposals that outline how the funding will be used to implement the human trafficking task force specified within the application.

Potential applicants are encouraged to register for a pre-application webinar at 2:00 p.m. eastern time on January 17, 2017. The webinar will assist potential applicants in developing strong proposals and provide guidance on the application process.

Apply by February 27, 2017.


(Posted January 4, 2017)

December 2016

2017 National Crime Victims’ Service Awards Ceremony

Join OVC for the National Crime Victims’ Service Awards Ceremony. During the Ceremony, OVC will recognize individuals and organizations that demonstrate outstanding service in supporting crime victims and victim services.

  • When: 2:00–3:30 p.m. (Eastern Time) on April 7, 2017
  • Where: National Archives—William G. McGowan Theater
  • 700 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW.
  • Washington, DC 20408
  • Attendee Entrance: Constitution Avenue, between 7th and 9th Street, NW.
2017 NCVRW banner

Learn more about this event and register to attend. Register by March 24, 2017.

(Posted December 22, 2016)

2017 National Crime Victims' Rights Week Theme Artwork Now Available

NCVRW 2017We are pleased to present the 2017 National Crime Victims’' Rights Week (NCVRW) Resource Guide theme artwork, theme posters, and web artwork, designed to help communities and victim assistance providers promote awareness of crime victim issues.

View and download the 2017 NCVRW artwork today, available in both English and Spanish.

Join the NCVRW mailing list to be notified when the complete Resource Guide is available.


(Posted December 7, 2016)

Funding Opportunity: FY 2017 Coordinated Tribal Assistance Solicitation

The U.S. Department of Justice is seeking applicants for its Fiscal Year 2017 Coordinated Tribal Assistance Solicitation (CTAS). CTAS provides comprehensive funding to American Indian and Alaska Native tribal governments and tribal consortia to support public safety, victim services, and crime prevention.

Applicants can submit a single application and select from any or all of the nine purpose areas, including two administered by OVC:

  • Comprehensive Tribal Victim Assistance Program (CTVA): CTVA supports tribal program response to victims of crime, their families, and communities and provides trauma-informed, culturally competent holistic services.

  • Children's Justice Act Partnerships for Indian Communities Program (CJA): CJA supports the investigation and prosecution of child abuse, especially child sexual abuse and comprehensive and coordinated multidisciplinary responses to child abuse victims and their families in ways that are trauma-informed and culturally competent.

To learn more about this funding opportunity, visit the CTAS solicitation website. This site provides FAQs, templates, and other materials that will help guide you through the application process.

Apply by 9:00 p.m. ET on February 28, 2017.


(Posted December 1, 2016)

October 2016

2017 National Crime Victims’ Rights Week Online Theme Poster and Color Palette

2017 PosterThe 2017 National Crime Victims' Rights Week (NCVRW) Theme Poster digital download and color palette are now available.

NCVRW will be commemorated April 2–8, 2017, and this year’s theme—Strength. Resilience. Justice.—reflects this vision of the future. One, in which all victims are strengthened by the response they receive, organizations are resilient in response to challenges, and communities are able to seek collective justice and healing.

2017 Color PaletteVisit the NCVRW section of our website for additional information.

Join the NCVRW mailing list to receive email updates, including the release of the 2017 Resource Guide.


(Posted October 27, 2016)

September 2016

Sign up now for NCVRW 2017 resources

Sign up now to ensure you receive all available educational materials and the theme poster for next year's National Crime Victims' Rights Week (NCVRW), which will be observed April 2-8, 2017.

Join the NCVRW mailing list before October 21, 2016 to receive:

  • 2017 NCVRW Theme Poster digital download and optional printed copy;
  • 2017 NCVRW Resource Guide digital download;
  • Details concerning the National Crime Victims’ Service Awards Ceremony; and
  • Information about future National Crime Victims’ Service Award nomination periods.

Visit the NCVRW section of our site about how NCVRW helps inspire and strengthen communities to raise awareness for victims’ rights.


(Posted September 20, 2016)

 

For older announcements, visit the News Archive